Commandantenhus Stralsund

Coat of arms on the Commandantenhus in Stralsund

The Commandantenhus was built as the administrative seat of the Swedish garrison commander in the years 1748-1751. Together with other historical buildings, it adorns the Alte Markt (Old Market Square) of Stralsund. A striking allusion to its former function is the large coat of arms in its gable field. [German]

Manhole cover in Füssen

Manhole cover in Füssen, Germany

On the manhole covers in Füssen you can see the local city arms. Even though the name of the town origins from a latin word (fauces) the coat of arms refers to the later interpretation of the word Füssen which sounds like the German term Füße. Especially in Bavarian areas, this term is used for legs.

Manhole cover in Rostock

Manhole cover in Rostock, Germany

The manhole covers in Rostock display the city arms. The coat of arms dating back to 1367 depicts a golden griffin of a blue field (representing the former princes of Rostock) with bars of silver and red (the colours of the Hanseatic League). As a member of the Hanseatic League the city is named Hansestadt Rostock. [German]

Manhole cover in Coburg

Manhole cover of Coburg, Germany

The manhole covers in Coburg show the city’s arms. They display the head of Saint Maurice, the patron of Coburg. According to legend, Saint Maurice died as leader of the Theban Legion, a martyr’s death in the 3rd century. In general this depiction of him is known as Coburger Mohr (Coburg Moor).  [German]

Coat of arms of Munich

Compilation of Munich city arms

This mural at the tower of the old town hall displays a compilation of seals and coat of arms related to Munich. The dates tell when each emblem was in use. The Old Town Hall (Altes Rathaus) was the domicile of the municipality until 1874. Today it serves as a building for representative purposes for the city council in Munich.

Coat of arms of Kindberg

Coat of arms of Kindberg, Austria

On my walk to an industrial heritage site next to Kindberg, I came across the city arms of Kindberg depicted in a not official town sign at the city boundary. The pic displays the inverted side of the city arms. The meaning refers to a legend that after a flood a missed child was found on top of a hill playing with flowers.